Domestic Omega-3s: There Are Other Options Than Imported Atlantic Salmon

Feeling Disappointed That Atlantic Salmon May Not Be Healthy For You Or The Economy?

The proliferation of Atlantic Salmon within our country is the direct result of great marketing. Unfortunately, not every consumer wants to take the marketing bait! Keep in mind that there are other options. When it comes to Atlantic Salmon, there are five general details that makes many smoked salmon, sushi-roll-loving and "I want my omega 3's!" consumers want to find an alternative to Atlantic Salmon.  We're here to help!

LOOK TOWARDS SHELLFISH FOR OMEGA-3S

Sure, salmon contains a great amount of omega-3s, but so does shellfish! Throwing back six oysters on the halfshell could provide you more omega 3s than a portion of salmon.  Plus, oysters and other domestically grown shellfish help the environment instead of polluting the environment like fish farming.  Shellfish provide valuable environmental services like filtering water, sequestering carbon. Purchasing domestically grown shellfish directly benefits our local economy.

CHOOSE WILD SALMON IN MODERATION WHEN IT IS IN-SEASON 

Remember, there are 5 other types of salmon in the U.S. There’s King, Sockeye, Coho, Chum (Keta), and Pink.  Wild salmon is in-season June-August depending on regulations.   When buying fresh wild salmon this summer, choose Coho or Sockeye since Keta and Pink are more commonly used for canned salmon.

King is called King for a reason. It only represents a small portion of the catch and therefore is probably not going to make it to your grocery store.  If you do spot the King at the grocery store at a reasonable price, it’s likely an Elvis in Las
Vegas-it’s not the real King.

 
 Seasonality of New England Seafood

Seasonality of New England Seafood

 Which Fish We're Overeating 

Which Fish We're Overeating 

 
 

IF YOU’RE HEART IS STILL FOCUSED ON ATLANTIC SALMON, Consider the Faroe Islands

Not all Atlantic Salmon is raised the same.  Faroe Island salmon comes from the small cluster of islands between Iceland, Scotland and Norway.  The cold and strong currents paired with the Faroese attitude for ethical salmon production, makes the islands a great place to raise some healthy and delicious pink fleshy fish.  Faroe Island Salmon are raised without antibiotics, the sea cages are bigger and fish are grown in low densities (lots of open swimming area!).

Conclusion

While wild Alaskan salmon is the best (for taste, domestic economy, animal welfare, etc.), not everyone is willing to pay the $16+/lb for a wild fish. At the same time, what are you really buying/supporting when you purchase "Fresh" farmed Atlantic Salmon at $6/lb from another country?

Everyone's sushi and omega-3 fix can't be supported from wild populations sustainably so someone has to make a sacrifice, right?

Now that you know these fish factoids, perhaps you have a better concept of these amazing fish. Next time you see Atlantic Salmon and Wild Caught Alaskan Salmon, you'll know that there are more differences between the two fillets than price.

 It's Not Just Price: 5 Key Differences Between Atlantic Salmon and Wild Salmon

It's Not Just Price: 5 Key Differences Between Atlantic Salmon and Wild Salmon

It’s Not Just Price: 5 Key Differences Between Atlantic Salmon and wild salmon.

The way we fish for popular seafood such as salmon, tuna and shrimp is threatening to ruin our oceans. Paul Greenberg explores...